The Myrtleville House Museum is a proud community partner that
provides curriculum based education programs to our local schools.
We offer a variety of dynamic programming for elementary levels
that can be hosted at our museum or in your own classroom. Our hands on,
interactive lessons target various learning styles and allows your
class to explore the history of their community. Programming reflects
the goals of the Ontario Curriculum, including the First Nations, Metis,
and Inuit Education Policy Framework
. Teachers, let us supply the skills,
materials and expertise to enrich your social studies lesson plan.

General Info:

  • Programs are 100 minutes in length and the cost is $5.50 per student
  • Outreach programs are $85.00 and an additional $10 for those not located in Brantford.
  • With advance notice, programs can be made to accommodate different learning
    requirements.
  • We are wheelchair accessible.
  • Please let us know upon booking of any allergy information
  • No fee for supervisors or chaperones

Playful Pastimes

Grade Level: Kindergarten

Booking: All Year

In an age before video games, movies, or battery operated toys, how in the world did children spend their leisure time? Discover the toys and games of yesterday’s child. Students will see how the Good children lived over a hundred years ago, go for a hunt in the historic house, and bake a traditional recipe in the historic kitchen. The Playful Pastimes program is designed to allow kindergarteners to learn through play. By exploring the lives of the Myrtleville Children, students will continue to expand their personal and social development. This enjoyable hands-on museum experience will help foster a love of learning and support future success in field study. Young museum goers will enjoy baking in the historic kitchen, exploring the museum while on a mouse hunt, as well as making and playing with traditional wooden toys of the early settlers.

Curriculum Connections (click to expand)

Kindergarten:

  • Use play as a means to further their learning in the areas of problem solving, mathematics, science and technology, the arts, language and to continue developing social skills.
  • Communicate effectively by listening and speaking.
  • Practice listening, speaking and responding to fellow classmates.
  • Show awareness of the passage of time.
  • Participate in games or experiment with toys that include counting and numbers and require balance, co-ordination, perceptual skill and spatial awareness.
  • Express their own thoughts and share experiences.
  • Participate in visual arts activities using a variety of materials.
  • Compare the leisure activities of the early settlers to entertainment today.
  • Recognize the museum as a special place within the community and understand its function.

Harvest Moon

Grades: Kindergarten – Grade 3

Booking: September – November

Join the Myrtleville House Museum in “bringing in the sheaves” this fall as we prepare for the long winter ahead. The Harvest Moon Program is a hands-on educational adventure that explores the busy harvest season of the early settlers. Students will study the cycle of the seasons and how these seasonal changes affected daily life in the past. Students will enjoy a tour of the historic house and workshop, baking apple cookies in the historic kitchen, making cider, and shelling and grinding corn.

Big Ideas:

 

  • Gr.1 Communities have natural and built features and provide services that help meet the needs of people who live and work there.
    Changes occur in daily and seasonal cycles, these changes affect living things. Everything that happens is a result of using some form of energy.
  • Gr.2 The traditions that we celebrate today have developed over the generations.
  • Gr.3 The different communities in early nineteenth century Canada influence the way we live today.
    Social and environmental challenges were a major part of life in all communities in early nineteenth century Canada.

Curriculum Connections (click to expand)

Kindergarten

  • Use play as a means to further their learning in the areas of problem solving, mathematics, science and technology, the arts, language and to continue developing social skills.
  • Communicate effectively by listening and speaking.
  • Practice listening, speaking and responding to fellow classmates.
  • Show awareness of the passage of time.
  • Participate in games or experiment with toys that include counting and numbers and require balance, co-ordination, perceptual skill, and spatial awareness.
  • Express their own thoughts and share experiences.
  • Compare the leisure activities of the early settlers to entertainment today.
  • Recognize the museum as a special place within the community and understand its function.

Grade One

Social Studies

B3 Understanding Context: The Elements of the Local Community
  • B3.1 Identify some of the natural and built features of their community by recognizing
    the importance and role of a museum in the community.

Science and Technology

Earth and Space Systems: Daily and Seasonal Changes
  • 1.1 Assess the impact of daily and seasonal changes on human outdoor activities and identify innovations that allow for some of these activities to take place indoors out of season.
Understanding Matter and Energy
  • 1.2 Describe how the everyday lives of different people and other living things would
    be affected if electrical energy were no longer available

Grade Two

Social Studies

A. Heritage and Identity: Changing Family and Community Traditions
A1: Why Traditions Change
  • A1.1 Compare ways in which some traditions have celebrated over multiple generations
A3: Understanding Context: Tradition and Heritage
  • A3.5 Demonstrate an understanding of simple chronology
  • A3.6 Identify ways in which heritage is passed on through various community
    celebrations and events

Grade Three

Social Studies

Heritage and Identity: Communities in Canada 1780 – 1850
A1. Application: Life in Canada Then and Now
  • A1.2: Compare some of the roles of and challenges facing the people in Canada around the beginning of the nineteenth century with those in the present day.
A2: Inquiry: Community Challenges and Adaptations
  • A2.1 formulate questions to guide investigations into some of the major challenges
    facing different groups and communities in Canada from 1780 – 1850.
  • A2.2 Gather and organize information on major challenges facing different groups and
    communities and on measures taken to address these challenges, using a variety of primary and secondary
    sources.

Science and Technology

Understanding Life Systems: Growth and Changes in Plants
3. Understanding Basic Concepts
  • 3.7 Describe the different ways plants are grown for food.

Good Cheer

Grades: Kindergarten – Grade 3

Booking:November – January

Tis the season to be jolly! Join the Myrtleville House Museum this festive season and discover the traditions of Christmas Past. Explore early settler Christmas traditions such as the adoption of the Christmas tree, the emergence of gift-giving, and the holiday season before Santa Claus. Students will have the opportunity to trace changing traditions through a variety of hands-on holiday activities, including the chance to make their very own wooden toy! Baking traditional gingerbread cookies in the historic kitchen will be a highlight of this fun field trip.

Big Ideas:

  • Gr.1 Communities have natural and built features and provide services that help meet the needs of people who live and work there.
    Changes occur in daily and seasonal cycles, these changes affect living things. Everything that happens is a result of using some form of energy.

    Gr.2 The traditions that we celebrate today have developed over the generations.
    Gr.3 The different communities in early nineteenth century Canada influence the way we live today.
    Social and environmental challenges were a major part of life in all communities in early nineteenth century Canada.

Curriculum Connections (click to expand)

Kindergarten

  • Use play as a means to further their learning in the areas of problem solving, mathematics, science and technology, the arts, language and to continue developing social skills.
  • Communicate effectively by listening and speaking.
  • Practice listening, speaking and responding to fellow classmates.
  • Show awareness of the passage of time.
  • Participate in games or experiment with toys that include counting and numbers and require balance, co-ordination, perceptual skill and spatial awareness.
  • Express their own thoughts and share experiences.
  • Participate in visual arts activities using a variety of materials.
  • Compare the leisure activities of the early settlers to entertainment today.
  • Recognize the museum as a special place within the community and understand its function.

Grade One

Social Studies

B3 Understanding Context: The Elements of the Local Community
  • B3.1 Identify some of the natural and built features of their community by recognizing
    the importance and role of a museum in the community.
Science and Technology
Earth and Space Systems: Daily and Seasonal Changes
  • 1.1 Assess the impact of daily and seasonal changes on human outdoor activities and
    identify innovations that allow for some of these activities to take place indoors out of season.
Understanding Matter and Energy
  • 1.2 Describe how the everyday lives of different people and other living things would be affected if electrical energy were no longer available

Grade Two

Social Studies

Heritage and Identity: Changing Family and Community Traditions
A1: Why Traditions Change
  • A1.1 Compare ways in which some traditions have celebrated over multiple generations.
A3: Understanding Context: Tradition and Heritage
  • A3.5 Demonstrate an understanding of simple chronology.
  • A3.6 Identify ways in which heritage is passed on through various community celebrations and events

Grade Three

Social Studies

Heritage and Identity: Communities in Canada 1780 – 1850
A1. Application: Life in Canada Then and Now
  • A1.2: Compare some of the roles of and challenges facing the people in Canada around the beginning of the nineteenth century with those in the present day.
A2: Inquiry: Community Challenges and Adaptations
  • A2.1 Formulate questions to guide investigations into some of the major challenges facing different groups and communities in Canada from 1780 – 1850.
  • A2.2 Gather and organize information on major challenges facing different groups and communities and on measures taken to address these challenges, using a variety of primary and secondary sources.

 


Settler Children

Grades: Kindergarten – Grade 3

Booking: All Year

Have you ever wondered what life was like for children before running water, school buses, and video games? Step into the lives of the Good family’s 10 Children and experience the life of a settler child from traditional chores to fun and games.
The Settler Children Program is designed to introduce students to the lives of the Good Family Children. Stepping back to a day in the life of an early settler child will allow students to compare their lives with the day to day challenges facing the people who founded our community. Students will tour the historic house and learn about the children’s role within it. Baking in the historic kitchen is a hands-on learning experience that will teach how early settlers fed their families. Finally students will practice a variety of traditional chores while discovering the gender roles of the early settlers as well as how daily activities were done without things like running water or electricity.

Big Ideas:

  • Gr.1 Communities have natural and built features and provide services that help meet the needs of people who live and work there.
    Changes occur in daily and seasonal cycles, these changes affect living things. Everything that happens is a result of using some form of energy.

    Gr.2 The traditions that we celebrate today have developed over the generations.
    Gr.3 The different communities in early nineteenth century Canada influence the way we live today.
    Social and environmental challenges were a major part of life in all communities in early nineteenth century Canada.

Curriculum Connections (click to expand)

Kindergarten

  • Use play as a means to further their learning in the areas of problem solving, mathematics, science and technology, the arts, language and to continue developing social skills.
  • Communicate effectively by listening and speaking.
  • Practice listening, speaking, and responding to fellow classmates.
  • Show awareness of the passage of time.
  • Participate in games or experiment with toys that include counting and numbers, and require balance, co-ordination, perceptual skill and spatial awareness.
  • Express their own thoughts and share experiences.
  • Participate in visual arts activities using a variety of materials.
  • Compare the leisure activities of the early settlers to entertainment today.
  • Recognize the museum as a special place within the community and understand its function.

Grade One

Social Studies

B3 Understanding Context: The Elements of the Local Community
  • B3.1 Identify some of the natural and built features of their community by recognizing the importance and role of a museum in the community.
Science and Technology
Earth and Space Systems: Daily and Seasonal Changes
  • 1.1 Assess the impact of daily and seasonal changes on human outdoor activities and
    identify innovations that allow for some of these activities to take place indoors out of season.
Understanding Matter and Energy
  • 1.2 Describe how the everyday lives of different people and other living things would be affected if electrical energy were no longer available

Grade Two

Social Studies

Heritage and Identity: Changing Family and Community Traditions
A1: Why Traditions Change
  • A1.1 Compare ways in which some traditions have celebrated over multiple generations.
A3: Understanding Context: Tradition and Heritage
  • A3.5 Demonstrate an understanding of simple chronology.
  • A3.4 students will describe some significant traditions and celebrations of their families, their peers, and their own communities, as well as some other communities in Canada.
  • A3.6 Identify ways in which heritage is passed on through various community celebrations and events

Grade Three

Social Studies

Heritage and Identity: Communities in Canada 1780 – 1850
A1. Application: Life in Canada Then and Now
  • A1.2: Compare some of the roles of and challenges facing the people in Canada around the beginning of the nineteenth century with those in the present day.
A2: Inquiry: Community Challenges and Adaptations
  • A2.1 Formulate questions to guide investigations into some of the major challenges facing different groups and communities in Canada from 1780 – 1850.
  • A2.2 Gather and organize information on major challenges facing different groups and
    communities and on measures taken to address these challenges, using a variety of primary and secondary sources.

 


School Bells

Grade: 3

Booking: All Year

Go back in time to 1860 and discover what life was like in a one room schoolhouse! In the School Bells Program, students can step back in time in their own classroom and learn through role pay. Students will obey the strict rules of the one room school house and receive a traditional reading, writing, and arithmetic lesson. From drawing and labeling a bean plant to a traditional spelling bee, these lessons will teach the students what it was really like in a one room school house. Students will enjoy writing on slate boards, and dressing up is encouraged.

Big Ideas:

 

  • The different communities in early nineteenth century Canada influence the way we live today.Social and environmental challenges were a major part of life in all communities in early nineteenth century Canada.Plants have distinct characteristics. There are similarities and differences among various types of plants. Plants are the primary source of food for humans.

Curriculum Requirements (click to expand)

Grade Three

Social Studies

Heritage and Identity: Communities in Canada 1780 – 1850
A1. Application Life in Canada Then and Now
  • A1.2: Compare some of the roles of and challenges facing the people in Canada around the beginning of the nineteenth century with those in the present day.
A2: Inquiry: Community Challenges and Adaptations
  • A2.1 Formulate questions to guide investigations into some of the major challenges facing different groups and communities in Canada from 1780 – 1850.
  • A2.2 Gather and organize information on major challenges facing different groups and communities and on measures taken to address these challenges, using a variety of primary and secondary sources.

Science and Technology

Understanding Life Systems Growth and Changes in Plants
  • 3.2 Identify the major parts of plants including the root, stem, flower stamen, pistil, leaf, seed, and fruit, and describe how each contribute to the plants survival within the plants environment.

Language and Math

Students will receive a traditional reading, writing, and arithmetic lesson, and take part in a spelling bee. They will practice their literacy and numeracy skills by reading a short story, writing short sentences, practicing their printing or cursive writing, spelling grade three level words, and solving simple addition and subtraction questions.

 


Interactions between First Nations and Europeans in Early Canada

Grades: 5 & 6

Booking: All Year

Students will explore the complex relationship between First Nations and Early Settlers before 1713. Students will begin by investigating ways in which the early settlers and First Nations assisted each other with trade, medicinal knowledge, and mapping. Utilizing a variety of primary and secondary resources, students will dig deeper into these interactions and investigate the conflict that arose between the First Nations and Early Settlers. Students will focus on how interactions between people can be positive for some and negative for others. Students will demonstrate their knowledge by preparing tableaus based on art and other primary resources.

Big Ideas:

  • Integration of education opportunities to improve knowledge of ALL students in Ontario about the rich culture and histories of the First Nations, Metis, and Inuit Peoples (FNMI Policy Framework)
    Gr.5 Interactions between people have consequences that can be positive for some and negative for others.
    When studying interrelationships between groups of people, it is important to be aware each group has its own perspective on those interrelationships.

    Gr.6 Many different communities have made significant contributions to Canada’s development.
    Different groups may experience the same development or event in different ways.
    Significant events in different communities have contributed to the development of the identity of that community and of Canada.

Curriculum Connections (click to expand)

Grade 5

Social Studies

A. Heritage and Identity: First Nations and Europeans in New France and Early Canada
A1. Application: The Impact of Interactions
  • A1.1 Describe some of the positve and negative consequences of contact between First Nations and Europeans in New France.
  • A1.2 Analyze aspects of early contact between First Nations and Europeans in New France to determine the ways in which different parties benefited.
A2. Inquiry: Perspectives on Interactions
  • A2.2 Gather and organize information on interactions among and between First Nations and Europeans during this period, using a variety of primary and secondary sources that present various perspectives.
  • A2.4 Interpret and analyze information and evidence relevant to their investigations using a variety of tools.
  • A2.5 Evaluate evidence and draw conclusions about aspects of the interactions among First Nations and Europeans during this time period, highlighting the perspectives of the different groups involved.
A3. Understanding Context: Significant Characteristics and Interactions
  • A3.5 Describe significant aspects of the interactions between the First Nations and European explorers and settlers during this time period.

The Arts

B.1 Creating and Presenting
Overall Expectations: Apply the creative process to dramatic play and process drama using the elements and conventions of drama to communicate feelings, ideas, and stories.
  • B1.1 Engage actively in drama exploration and role play, with a focus on examining issues and themes in fiction and non-fiction sources from diverse communities, times and places.
  • B1.2 Demonstrate an understanding of the element of role by selectively using some other elements of drama to build belief in a role and establish a dramatic context..
D3 Exploring Forms and Cultural Contexts
Overall Expectations: Demonstrate a knowledge of understanding a variety of art forms, styles and techniques from the past and present, and their sociocultural and historic contexts.
  • D3.2 Demonstrate an awareness of ways in which visual arts reflect the beliefs and traditions of a variety of peoples and people in different times and places.

Grade 6

Social Studies

A. Heritage and Identity: Communities in Canada Past and Present
A1. Application: Diversity, Inclusiveness, and Canadian Identity
  • A1.1 Explain how various features that characterize a community can contribute to the identity and image of a country and assess the contribution of some of these features to Canada’s image and identity.
  • A1.2 Evaluate some of the contributions that various ethnic and /or religious groups have made to Canadian Identity.
A2. Inquiry: The Perspective of Diverse Communities
  • A2.1 Formulate questions to guide investigations into different perspectives on the historical and/ or contemporary of two or more distinct communities in Canada.
  • A2.2 Gather and organize information from a variety of primary and secondary sources using various technologies.
  • A2.4 Interpret and analyse information and evidence relevant to their investigations using a variety of tools.
A3 Understanding Context: The Development of Communities in Canada
  • A3.5 Describe interactions between communities in Canada, including between newcomers and groups that were already in the country.

 

Contact Info:

To book an education program please contact the Education Officer:

Esther Brouwer (Education Officer)

esther.brouwer@brantmuseums.ca

Phone: (519) 752-3216

34 Myrtleville Drive, Brantford, Ontario, N3V 1C2